On Writing On My iPhone, Revisited

Apple iPhone 10X

A Brief History of Technology

It’s funny how succeeding generations take technology for granted. My Nana’s first electric refrigerator must have seemed to her to be a miracle. Nowadays the only time I consciously think about it is when I’m looking in it to make my grocery list.

And even that is more about food and shopping than it is about the refrigerator itself.

June 29, 2007

Not exactly a Day of Infamy.

I sat at the Apple iPhone help desk on the evening of its release. Even though we had just completed 2 weeks of intensive training on the operation and capabilities of the device, that evening was the first time any of us had actually seen one, much less had an opportunity to work with it.

One iPhone between 8 techs. No wonder callers were frustrated.

Now my grandchildren all carry iPhones. And while I still look at mine with an occasional sense of wonder, to them it ain’t no big thang.

During those weeks of training, I had an epiphany: this was no mere mobile phone! No. What Apple had done was figure out how to fit an entire computer in the palm of your hand!

It’s 11 and a half years later as I write this. Cell phone (or if you’re British, mobile) usage has exploded. The phones themselves have evolved into various flavors of smartphone, and whereas they were once considered a luxury, they have become for many of us an essential part of life.

Hell, I wouldn’t be surprised if a few people I know don’t even go into their own bathrooms without it!

But Here’s the Thing…

I love my iPhone X, which I once swore I would never own. My next upgrade was to be to the 8S or Plus or Z or whatever was the top of the line 8 at the time.

But my carrier had a special offer: buy one iPhone X and get a second one free! And so I decided on the X, not realizing that it was about to be replaced by a few newer, more improved models.

But that’s on me. My iPhone X still runs circles around my old 6S Plus.

Writing and Publishing

I’ve written before on how I love writing on my iPhone. How it’s become my main writing tool for whatever site I’m writing: Medium, letters to the editor, blog posts—you name it, I’ve written to it on my iPhone!

And on Medium and WordPress, at least, published as well.

That’s About to Change

Ever have an improvement that really wasn’t? When I bought my new laptop 3 years ago, a Windows 10 machine, it booted blindingly fast. Now, after a long series of updates, upgrades, and “improvements,” I can turn it on and almost have time to get dressed, go downstairs, eat breakfast, and wash the dishes before heading back upstairs in time to see the damn machine is ready—finally—for use.

With the release of iOS 12.1.1, my iPhone is still blindingly fast—compared to my original Motorola flip-phone.

And there are far more things that are easier and faster to do on my laptop than on my iPhone. Things specifically related to publishing what I write.

Even Medium’s own mobile app isn’t designed to publish straight to Medium; more and more often I find I need my laptop to prepare my stories for final publication.

The Solution

So here’s what I’ve decided.

(What? Did you seriously think I was going to invest all this time bitching about things without offering a solution? You obviously don’t know me very well.)

I’m still doing the bulk of my writing on my iPhone, with an occasional detour to the iPad.

But rather than publishing (in Medium’s case, posting) what I write directly to the web or wherever, I’ll save my drafts. Then I’ll move to the laptop to massage them, add images and links, make them pretty, and then publish them.

And Apple? I’m sorry, my old friend, but I was wrong: you still haven’t managed to put a computer in the palm of my hand.

And as we techies like to say in our own inimical, technobabbly way, “Close, but no cigar.”

Image: Plasencia Cigars

 

A New iPad

My iPad Mini was starting to show its age. It was slow, and I made the mistake of buying one with the minimum amount of memory. You can’t do a whole lot with 32Gb, and I wanted one with more.

The problem? I couldn’t afford to buy one outright, so I took me off to the Verizon store, where I picked up a new iPad with 1128Gb of memory. It came with a phone line, and I only had to pay the sales tax. THAT I could handle. 49 bucks and some change.

When I got home, it took me about an hour to backup the iPad Mini and wipe it clean, and then restore that backup to the new unit. Finally, I updated all of the apps on the new one and loaded the latest system update.

Best of all is discovering that if I take the old iPad into the Apple Store, they’ll give me a $95 gift card, which I’ll use to buy a screen protector and a new case, since the old ones don’t fit the new device.

I’m running a backup on the new iPad right now, and once that’s done, I should be good to go.

It’s nice to have something good happen for a change.

ipad

An Experiment in Technology

I’ve recently been wondering about the effects that different writing tools have on the act of writing. I’ve always been curious about this, and in the mid 1980s I even wrote a college thesis on the subject. I had created a questionnaire for my fellow students to see what, if any, effect that then-brand-new technology called word processing had on their writing.

Today, some 30 years later, I’ve reprised the question: is my writing any different on my laptop, my iPad, or my iPhone?

My writing instrument of choice is my laptop computer. It has a large screen, but what I like the most about it is the ability to switch quickly to a dictionary or a thesaurus when I need to, and the ability to Google® any subject I like.

My iPhone and iPad are both handy when I get an idea when I’m away from my computer. I can jot down a note, idea, or whatever and have it available when I get home again. I will admit that I prefer the iPad to the iPhone.

(I’ll list all of my writing software on the Writing Software page.)

Robyn Jane