Archives

Unsplash

I recently discovered a new (well, new to me, anyway) photo sharing site. Unsplash is a source for high-resolution, high-quality photographs. What makes them different from other similar sites is that you can use all of the images royalty-free. What does that mean in practical terms?

Unsplash License (for users)

All photos published on Unsplash can be used for free. You can use them for commercial and noncommercial purposes. You do not need to ask permission from or provide credit to the photographer or Unsplash, although it is appreciated when possible.

More precisely, Unsplash grants you an irrevocable, nonexclusive copyright license to download, copy, modify, distribute, perform, and use photos from Unsplash for free, including for commercial purposes, without permission from or attributing the photographer or Unsplash. This license does not include the right to compile photos from Unsplash to replicate a similar or competing service.

Even though credit isn’t required, Unsplash photographers appreciate a credit as it provides exposure to their work and encourages them to continue sharing. A credit can be as simple as adding their name with a link to their profile or photo:

Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

Simple enough, right?

Still, I hesitated. I had my doubts. How do I, as a semi-professional photographer, benefit from giving my work away for free? Why would anyone choose to hire me when they could get my work for free? So I did some further checking.

It turns out that a lot of photographers whose works have been discovered through Unsplash have been hired my the very companies that used their free images. These clients liked something that they saw in the photographer’s work and decided to hire them for specific projects. And that’s the kind of advertising that money just can’t buy!

Unsplash License (For Photographers)

Limited License to Us. You grant us a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license (with the right to sublicense) to host, store, transfer, display, adapt, perform, reproduce, modify, translate, and distribute your User Content (in whole or in part) in any media formats and through any media channels (now known or hereafter developed). You understand that we will not pay you for any use of your Photos and that your Photos will be made available to the public for their use without providing you attribution or compensation.


Authority. When you upload Photos to the Service, in addition to the license that you grant us to post the Photos publicly and permit other Unsplash users to download and use them, you also authorize us under your copyrights to enforce any violations of the sublicenses we grant in the Photos to others. In other words, if an Unsplash user misuses one of your Photos downloaded from the Service, you authorize us to enforce your copyrights in the Photos on your behalf.

So I’ve  decided to give it a try. I’ll let you know how it goes.


My Writer’s Toolbox—Re-Tooled

Every now and then I reevaluate the apps and programs I’ve been using to write. The perfect suite would be one that I could use on all of my devices: my iPad and iPhone running (as of this writing) iOS 11, and my laptop PC running Windows. Add into that mix the fact that when my wife and I write something together, she’s on her iPad Pro and writing with Apple’s Pages.

For her, it’s easy: whatever she writes will sync automagically across all of her devices. For me, it’s another story.

The Previous Solution

It was something I cobbled together, based on the fact that Pages wasn’t available on my PC—which is where I do the bulk of my writing and editing. Since Pages will export to MS Word format, and LibreOffice will read and write MS Office files, it was a simple matter of Stacey exporting her efforts in .docx format and sending them as attachments in emails. I could then either edit them and send them back to her, or append them to the master document.

All of this was before the Cloud. After the Cloud, we used DropBox and iCloud instead of emails.

The Better Solution

Recent changes to Pages have made things even easier: I can now log into my iCloud account via my Windows browser, and use the on-line version of Pages to write and edit! My edits are saved, and both Stacey and I have access to them no matter which device we’re on.

It’s a Fact of Life

You’d think that after using computers since the early ‘80s, and having worked as both an educator and a service engineer, I would have learned my lesson: go big! But no. Which means that when it came time for me to make the jump from an Android phone to my new iPhone 6s Plus, I’d have maxed out the options. Nope. Just the basic 16 Gb memory.

Which means that I rely on the Cloud even more than before. Still, the iPhone X is almost here, but $1000 is a lot of money to spend. Would I be better off keeping what I have now and upgrade my iPad Mini to an iPad Pro? If I did that, I might not even need to use my laptop for writing anymore.

Decisions, decisions…

My Current Writer’s Toolbox

Three devices:

  • iPhone
  • iPad Mini
  • Lenovo laptop PC

Software:

  • Apple’s Pages (a free download)
  • LibreOffice Writer (also free)
  • Scrivener (free evaluation copy)
  • iCloud from Apple
  • Dropbox (because there’s no such thing as having too many backups. This is in addition to my daily automagic backup to my external hard drive.)

What About You?

Do you deal with different platforms and incompatibilities? If so, do you have a system that works for you? Let me know—I’m always open to suggestions.

Thanks!
Robyn Jane